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The unwritten rules for fitness industry jobs : 02 Nov 2012

HealthyPeople was founded on the notion that if employers have an easier way of connecting with candidates outside of job ads this will result in more opportunities for fitness industry professionals. Last month we showed that this new way of recruiting is taking hold. More than 200 hand picked CV's were downloaded from our site in October. We encourage more professionals to list themselves and more employers to find out how easy it can be to connect with local candidates.

Unwritten rules for fitness industry jobs


Every job in fitness is in sales.

I'm not suggesting that there is the 'closing the sale' mentality in all situations, just that every contact with a client is an opportunity to learn more about what they need and answer the question with how you're going to provide it.

For example, the way the person at the desk answers the phone at the initial contact will have a big impact on whether that person goes on to become a member. Personal Trainers often see themselves as a Trainer first and a sales person a distant second. Unfortunately, without the sales, no one is ever going to know how good a Trainer you are!

It's not uncommon for staff to push back against things like sales training, but over the last six years of recruiting for this industry, one thing has become very clear, the successful careers are those where people are able to best represent (read 'sell') both themselves and the businesses they work for.

Job advertising happens LAST, so get in early

No employer starts their day hoping to place a job ad. It cost money and time and causes stress, so if you're keen to work in an area or with a specific employer, get to know them and make sure they know you. That way, when an opportunity arises, you're first on the list.

Personal Trainers, family and friends do not count as professional experience

Stating family and friends as clients on your resume is only distracting the employer from other information that may better help your application. By all means, train as many people as possible to build your confidence and test your abilities. It all counts, just not as professional experience.

If you're just doing a course for the CEC's, you're missing the point

Obviously CECs or PDPs or whatever are required for maintaining registration with any governing body, but they should only be considered a bonus for undertaking a certain course. Make the most of all opportunities to further your knowledge and experience. If you have an opportunity to move closer to your goals, worry about the CEC's later.

If you can't do 25 push ups and a few chin ups, you're not a Personal Trainer

I borrowed this one from Thomas Plummer's 'Unwritten rules of Personal Training'. He writes, "You don’t have to be Superman, but you have to at least be able to demonstrate a technique." It's going to be hard to convince anyone that you're the real deal when the clients are fitter than you are.

The fitness industry is about a lifestyle, not just a career

You don't need to be a freak about everything, but you do need to practice what you preach. To quote Plummer again, "Credibility isn’t about competing in a championship fitness contest, it’s about leading a life that is health and fitness based and that you practice what you preach." To be clear, smoking is out!

Have a great week and as Ghandi once said, "be the change you look for in others".

Regards, Dennis Hosking

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